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Stateside

Monday through Friday @ 3:00 p.m. & 10 p.m.

Conversations about what matters in Michigan.

Stateside covers a wide range of Michigan news and policy issues — as well as culture and lifestyle stories. In keeping with Michigan Radio’s broad coverage across southern Michigan, Stateside focuses on topics and events that matter to people all across the state. Stateside is hosted by Cynthia Canty (Mon-Thu) and Lester Graham (Fri). 

To find audio for the full show you can subscribe to our podcast or go here.

According to Chopra, diagnosis is a complicated process made only more difficult by time constraints.
Public Domain

President Trump’s immigration ban of seven countries with predominantly Muslim populations is causing consequences to healthcare.

An article for The Conversation outlines what’s at stake.

While the immigration ban is temporarily suspended by the courts, the authors of the article write that the travel ban has already had significant consequences.

Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

We headed to the city of Monroe in the southeast corner of the state for our latest Artisans of Michigan. We visited Michigan Musical Instrument Service. Kevin Powers has been repairing instruments there since 1987.

“I do most of the work for the Detroit symphony, all the brass players, the Toledo symphony, some of the guys from Cleveland. Those would be my occasional clients. My everyday ones are the school kids that come in with a dent in the trumpet. That’s who my normal customers are,” Powers

Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

This week, Michigan Governor Rick Snyder admonished Republicans for rushing legislation to eventually eliminate the state income tax. Meanwhile Kalamazoo, Saginaw and Detroit schools are fighting possible closings. And to top it all off, President Trump hosted a dramatic press conference yesterday that left many scratching their heads.

According to Laura Reese, while Midtown Detroit is seeing some income growth, the rest of the city is only getting worse
Wikimedia user, Andrew Jameson / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

Over the past several years, the conventional wisdom has been that Detroit is recovering. Every new restaurant, boutique store, or retail chain setting up shop in Detroit is offered as proof.

There’s a major flaw in that assessment.

The focus of recent development has been the city’s central business districts. Meanwhile, the people in the neighborhoods are not sharing in that prosperity. If anything, the plight of Detroit’s long-time residents has been getting worse.

Fishing on Lake Michigan.
Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

It’s supposed to be warm throughout the state of Michigan this weekend. Really warm: highs may breach 60 in the southeast corner of the state, while up in the U.P. temperatures could be in the low 50s.

If you’re looking for a good way to get outdoors and take advantage of our temporarily tropical climate, the state’s Department of Natural Resources has an idea for you:

The summer blast happens to coincide with the state’s winter free fishing weekend, during which angling on Michigan’s lakes, rivers and streams requires no fishing license.

STEVE CARMODY / Michigan Radio

The City of Flint is considering changing its charter, which could change how city government operates, taxes and more. It could stiffen ethics rules and change other rules to make city hall more transparent.

The Flint Charter Review Commission is proposing the changes. Cleora Magee chairs that commission and she joined Stateside to discuss.

Frontier Ruckus
Noah Elliott Morrison

Enter the Kingdom is the 5th LP from Michigan's own Frontier Ruckus.

Rolling Stone calls it "a serious and thought-provoking record."

As part of our Songs from Studio East series, we look at how the band continues to evolve musically while still holding on to their roots.

It took four years for Frontier Ruckus to come out with their newest album.

Ilitch Holdings, LLC

His empire was built on pizza.

With last week’s death of Mike Ilitch, that empire is now in the hands of his son Christopher.

Danielle Atkinson is the mother of five children. Three of them were born at home.
Josh Hakala / Michigan Radio

A new law recently signed by Governor Rick Snyder means home birth midwives in Michigan will need to be licensed.

What does this mean for women who want to give birth at home in Michigan?

fhwrdh / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

The Next Idea

Thirty years ago, University of Chicago Professor Allan Bloom published The Closing of the American Mind. The book deconstructed higher education’s failure to prepare students with the knowledge necessary to lead enlightened lives. Bloom’s emphasis on reading the Great Books was met with adulation by conservatives, who viewed it as a declaration of traditional values, and with condemnation by progressives who thought the work was a perpetuation of social class inequities.

Spiegel & Grau, 2016

 

I first became aware of the writer Andy Mozina when he published a short story collection titled Quality Snacks, with Wayne State University Press’ "Made in Michigan" series back in 2014.

Flickr / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Apples and immigration documents. Soybeans and border walls. Today is a “Day Without Immigrants,” and a number of Michigan farms are quieter than normal.

Businesses of all kinds are closed across the country as immigrants stayed home from work and school in response to President Trump’s immigration policies.

This “Day Without Immigrants” reaches not just factories and restaurants, but Michigan’s farms, where migrant and undocumented workers make up a large percentage of the work force.

Flint residents Laura and Sean MacIntyre stopped paying their water bills in 2016.
Mark Brush / Michigan Radio

People in Flint who have been getting the state to help pay their water bills appear to be losing that help.

Flint Mayor Karen Weaver met with Governor Snyder on Tuesday. She was unable to get him to budge from the decision to put an early end to the state-funded subsidy program that helped people pay for the water they can't safely drink without a filter.

Screengrab / YouTube

Learning disabilities are often invisible to everyone but the people who have them.

Eventually, though, the secret gets out. When that happens, it can be an incredibly emotional experience.

CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION, COURTESY DR. FLANDERS

The warnings about "superbug infections" and over prescribing antibiotics have been getting stronger and louder in recent years. Yet, it's still happening and we are seeing people die from infections that are caused by these so-called superbugs.

The Centers for Disease Control, for example, is telling us that every year 75,000 Americans with hospital-aquired infections are dying while they're in the hospital.

Courtesy of the Detroit Symphony Orchestra

No matter where you are, when you say the words "Detroit" and "music," someone's going to exclaim "Motown!"

But Detroit's music history is much deeper and wider than Motown. There are some locations around the city that have been forgotten and are important in the telling of Detroit's black history, and the history of music.

STEVE CARMODY / MICHIGAN RADIO

Plenty of attention has been paid to the human toll of the Flint water crisis and the city's efforts to recover. But what about the business side of things and the city's effort to rebuild the economy?

Leelanau raclette puts Michigan "on the world cheese map"

Feb 14, 2017
DAN WANSCHURA / Interlochen Public Radio

Anne and John Hoyt own Leelanau Cheese Company in Suttons Bay. Leelanau Cheese is famous for it’s raclette.

“When people ask what it tastes like, I often say it’s between a gouda and a gruyere,” says Anne.

Thanks to the rise in popularity of craft beer in Michigan, the state now ranks fourth in the nation in hops production.
Rob Sirrine / Michigan State University

As Michigan's brewing industry continues to grow and flourish, we're seeing a big jump in growing hops in our state.

Consider this: Prior to 2008, Michigan hadn't had a commercial hops-growing operation for more than a century. Now, we're fourth in the nation.

Shelby Kroske, MSU Libraries

 

Michigan State University historian Liam Brockey has spent years studying the history of Catholicism. Now, that scholarship is generating something unexpected: Oscar buzz.

Brockey served as a consultant on legendary filmmaker Martin Scorsese’s latest work “Silence,” the story of two Portuguese Jesuit priests who travel to Japan in the 1640's to find their lost mentor.

Rick Pluta / Michigan Radio

The story broke last September in the Indianapolis Star. Complaints surfaced that a Michigan State University sports physician has been sexually assaulting young gymnasts for nearly 20 years.

To date, more than 60 women and girls have stepped forward to tell police they were sexually assaulted by Dr Larry Nassar.
 

More than 30 have filed civil lawsuits against Michigan State and Dr. Nassar, who is currently in the Ingham County Jail facing federal and state charges of sexual assault and child pornography.

Lansing-area attorney Jamie White represents ten of Dr. Nassar's alleged victims, including a current scholarship member of the MSU women's gynmastics team.

A Valentine's Day postcard arrived today from a friend of ours - Tamar Charney, who used to be our boss as programming director here at Michigan Radio. Now she's left us to be Managing Editor at NPR One. 

Dear Stateside:

I found a heart on the shore of Lake Michigan. It was a stone that had washed up in a storm on New Year's day. It was lying there in the sand with a bunch of other rocks. But this one stood out because it was shaped like a perfect Valentine's Day heart.

Russ / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

Every day, more than 20 million gallons of oil, some 540 thousand barrels, are pumped through two 63-year-old pipes lying at the bottom of the Straits of Mackinac. Those Enbridge Line 5 pipes are the focus of the Great Lakes Business Network, a newly-formed group of Michigan business leaders who want the twin pipeline shut down.

Among those leaders is Larry Bell. He is the founder and president of Bell’s Brewery, Michigan’s largest brewing company.

LESTER GRAHAM

The Next Idea 

 

We usually think of the economy as something centered around the flow of money for goods, services, and other enterprises. But what happens in places where that traditional model breaks down - where, for a variety of reasons, there simply isn’t much cash for anything? People learn to survive without it. They create “informal economies.” And in many parts of Detroit, these informal economies are at work, filling needs however they can.

Little Caesars Arena under construction in June 2016.
Rick Briggs / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

The city of Detroit lost one of its business icons when Mike Ilitch passed away. Many people know him for being the founder of Little Caesars Pizza, but most know him as the owner of the Detroit Tigers and the Detroit Red Wings.

Michigan Sports Hall of Famer Ray Lane began covering sports in Detroit starting in 1961 and was there when Ilitch bought the Red Wings in 1982 (for $8 million!), and later the Tigers in 1992. Lane joined Stateside to look back at the sports side of Ilitch's legacy.

John Beilein (left) and Tom Izzo (right) are in danger of both missing out on the NCAA tournament
MGoBlog / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

We're midway through February, which for college basketball fans means March Madness is just around the corner. Many fans around the state are likely saving those sick days to watch the opening round of the men's NCAA tournament, but fans in the Great Lakes State aren't guaranteed to have a home team to root for this year. 

For many Detroit Tigers fans, the demolition of Tiger Stadium remains a source of anger.
Michael Kumm / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Mike Ilitch certainly left his mark on downtown Detroit, beginning with the major renovation of the Fox Theatre in 1988 and continuing to this day with the ongoing construction of Little Caesars Arena for the Red Wings and the Pistons.

There are those who found a lot to criticize in the way the Ilitch family acquired downtown property, maintained that property, and financed its arenas.

Michigan Radio's senior news analyst Jack Lessenberry joined Stateside to talk about Ilitch's legacy when it comes to the business side of his life and what he did for the city of Detroit.

Courtesy of Monroe County Library System

 

Each February, the libraries in Monroe undergo a transformation. The Black History Month Blues Festival turns these sedate study spaces into concert spaces full of “laughing, singing, clapping,” and “stomping,” said Bill Reiser, the library manager at Ellis Library in Monroe.

U.S. Senator from Michigan Gary Peters (D) is joining calls for further investigations into the extent of Russian hacking during the presidential election.
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

These first three weeks of Donald Trump's new administration produced a dizzying flood of executive orders, actions, tweets, protests.

Today brought a chance to dig into all of it with U.S. Senator Gary Peters. In a wide-ranging interview, Stateside spoke with the senator about the current climate in Washington, Russian sanctions, Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch, Democratic resistance to the Trump administration's policies, and Peters' support of a missile defense base in Battle Creek. 

USEPA Environmental-Protection-Agency Follow

A listener recently asked Stateside the following question:

What does the Environmental Protection Agency do in Michigan?

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